Secret Scribbler

looking to be inspired

legalmexican:

noelleybellie:

#boysincroptops2k14

Winnie the Pooh slays all of u in the crop top movement

legalmexican:

noelleybellie:

#boysincroptops2k14

Winnie the Pooh slays all of u in the crop top movement

(via thebigblackwolfe)

futurerevolutions asked: What exactly are the approximate races of Alana and Marko? Like it's a fantasy/sci-fi deal so I know they're aliens but, let's be real, I seriously doubt the team would stray from this kind of question since they write a comic like this and the artist is an ~awake~ WoC?????

sagacomic:

fionastaples:

benrankel:

sagacomic:

“This is an original fantasy book with no superheroes, two non-white leads and an opening chapter featuring graphic robot sex. I thought we might be cancelled by our third issue.”

- Brian K. Vaughan (x)

Both Brian and Fiona have repeatedly said that their heroes are PoC. And of course it’s clear from Fiona’s illustrations that neither Alana nor Marko are white, but that Alana has darker skin than Marko.

The only featured/recurring character in the Saga universe who actually seems to have white skin is The Stalk.

However, I still come across white-washed Saga fan art and fancasting posts, which never cease to amaze and infuriate me. No matter how pretty the art, I will never repost that shit.

If people genuinely see these characters as white, they need to check their eyesight or their racism. And I doubt the optometrist will find any deficiencies.

Thanks for the ask. I haven’t had a good rant on this subject in a while!

Personal pet peeve is folks who think Marko is white. He ain’t.

Marko is meant to be Asian- more specifically, I combined features from a handful of Japanese models and actors when I was designing him. I can see why people sometimes mistake him for white, because I avoided using exaggerated racial markers (slanted eyes, rounded nose, etc). With simple cartoon drawings like these, a lot is left to the reader’s imagination. So I accept there will be some misidentification because I didn’t draw Marko’s family like Mulan characters, haha.

I see Alana as having mixed heritage. When I drew her father I was envisioning an Indian man. Her mother remains a mystery!

image

An answer from fionastaples herself!

(omg we are not worthy, etc!)

“We praise people for being “naturally” smart, too, “naturally” athletic, and etc. But studies continue to show, as they have for some time now, that it is generally healthier to praise schoolchildren for being hardworking, than for being naturally gifted. We know now that to emphasize a child’s inherent ability places pressure on that child to continue to be accidentally talented, which is something that is hard for anyone to control. When the children who are applauded for their natural skills fail, they are shown to take the failure very personally. After all, the process of their success has always seemed mysterious and basic and inseparable from the rest of their identity, so it must be they who are failing as whole people. When students are instead complimented and rewarded for their effort and improvement, they tend to not be so hard on themselves. When they fail, they reason, “Well, I’ll work harder next time.” They learn that they are capable of success, rather than constantly automatically deserving of it, and they learn simultaneously that they are bigger and more complex than their individual successes or failures.”

—   

Kate of Eat the Damn Cake, The Stupidity of “Natural” Beauty (via theimperfectascent)

I lost whole years of my life to self-loathing and self-sabotaging because I couldn’t sustain being ‘gifted’.  Don’t make the same mistake.

(via mossonhighheels)

(Source: eatthedamncake.com, via so-treu)

smartgirlsattheparty:

thetrevorproject:

recovery-atitsfinest:

Recovery is key to accepting yourself. Recovery blog. 

One day at a time. You’re getting there.

Our motto is, “Change the world by being yourself” and one of our favorite  Meredith Walker quotations is, “Being yourself is a life long quest.”
We love you, Smarties!

smartgirlsattheparty:

thetrevorproject:

recovery-atitsfinest:

Recovery is key to accepting yourself. Recovery blog. 

One day at a time. You’re getting there.

Our motto is, “Change the world by being yourself” and one of our favorite  Meredith Walker quotations is, “Being yourself is a life long quest.”

We love you, Smarties!

(Source: fuckin-f1t, via blueklectic)

jmberryfictionwriter:

If eyes are the window to the soul, a writer’s eyes afford a view on a world of wonder. Current/recent reads: Zadie Smith, Heidi Durrow, Taiye Selasi, Rebecca Walker, Tayari Jones, Dolen Perkins-Valdez, Edwidge Danticat, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Adelayo Adedayo for Wonderland Magazine

(Source: sisterjude, via iam-tellnoone)

“I have been astonished by hearing individuals who inherited wealth in childhood warn against sharing resources because people needing help should work for money in order to appreciate its value. Inherited wealth and/or substantial material resources are rarely talked about in the mass media because those who receive it do not wish to validate the idea that money received that is not a reward for hard work is beneficial. Their acceptance and use of this money to strengthen their economic self-sufficiency exposes the reality that working hard is rarely the means by which enough of us can gain enough access to material resources to become wealthy. One of the ironies of the culture of greed is that the people who profit the most from earnings they have not worked to attain are the most eager to insist that the poor and working classes can only value material resources attained through hard work. Of course, they are merely establishing a belief system that protects their class interests and lessens their accountability to those who are without privilege.”

—   bell hooks in All About Love: New Visions (via ethiopienne)

(Source: vanillaandlavender, via foxxxynegrodamus)

blackartiststudio:

∆ Robert Pruitt | Afrofuturist, Illustrator, Brown Paper Man, Charcoal King, Mr. Hair Did, Cosmic Child 

∆ Photographers | ArtPace, Robert Pruitt, etc.

(via blahblahbekke)


black? british? creative?
then we definitely want you
who? onyx magazine is a startup publication showcasing black British arts and we’re looking for creatives to feature in our very first issue
if you wanna be interviewed as well as have your work featured, that’s great. If you just wanna submit work, that’s cool too. or, if you wanna join the mag team, then come thru Jesus
what? creative arts includes (but is not limited to) poetry, literature, music, fashion, art, design, film, and photography, so if you feel your work falls under any of those categories, please hit us up at blackerthanonyxmag@gmail.com
the brief? there is no brief. so long as you fit the criteria (meaning, whenever you have to fill out a form, you tick the ‘british’ and ‘african/caribbean’ boxes), then we want to hear from you
it doesn’t have to be brand new content, but it can’t have been published for any other magazine, either in print or online
when? the first issue is scheduled for a June 2014 release, so all submissions need to be in before Monday 5th May 2014 so we have time to edit before going to print
why? as well as having your work in a printed publication – which always helps for the portfolio, on the CV etc etc – be a part of something new and exciting: a highbrow, high-end arts magazine for us and by us
we are blacker than onyx
blackerthanonyxmag@gmail.com
www.blackerthanonyx.tumblr.com

black?
british?
creative?

then we definitely want you

who? onyx magazine is a startup publication showcasing black British arts and we’re looking for creatives to feature in our very first issue

if you wanna be interviewed as well as have your work featured, that’s great. If you just wanna submit work, that’s cool too. or, if you wanna join the mag team, then come thru Jesus

what? creative arts includes (but is not limited to) poetry, literature, music, fashion, art, design, film, and photography, so if you feel your work falls under any of those categories, please hit us up at blackerthanonyxmag@gmail.com

the brief? there is no brief. so long as you fit the criteria (meaning, whenever you have to fill out a form, you tick the ‘british’ and ‘african/caribbean’ boxes), then we want to hear from you

it doesn’t have to be brand new content, but it can’t have been published for any other magazine, either in print or online

when? the first issue is scheduled for a June 2014 release, so all submissions need to be in before Monday 5th May 2014 so we have time to edit before going to print

why? as well as having your work in a printed publication – which always helps for the portfolio, on the CV etc etc – be a part of something new and exciting: a highbrow, high-end arts magazine for us and by us

we are blacker than onyx

blackerthanonyxmag@gmail.com

www.blackerthanonyx.tumblr.com

(via blackerthanonyx)

Read more than you write. In expressing the ambition to be a writer, you are committing yourself to the community of other writers. Your originality will mean nothing unless you can understand the originality of others. What we call originality is little more than the fine blending of influences.

Be ruthless in your use of what you’ve seen and what you’ve experienced. Add your imagination, so that where invention ends and reality begins is undetectable.

Be courageous. Nothing human should be far from you.